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New Zealand

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New Zealand, almost the same in size as England, is one of the most isolated and least populated countries in the world. It is a country of contrasts. Between the subtropical north and the more temperate south, the wet west and the drier east, the volcanoes and geothermal areas of the North Island and the fjord coasts and glaciers on the South Island.

 

Geological forces have created a spectacular landscape dominated by mountains, lakes and rivers. All this, in combination with the Maori- and the Great Ocean Islands culture and the wildlife, makes New Zealand a paradise for nature- and travel photographers.

In this gallery our most favorite shots made on our 2019 and 2020 journeys to New- Zealand.

New Zealand nature is a big inspiration for me. The light and the unique landscape is so phenomenal it gives one endless opportunities. Location: Lake Tekapo, South Island.

Kia Ora!

Kia Ora!

Welcome to the land of inspiring landscapes and incredible diversity which captured my heart and soul. Working on a photoshoot at Lake Pukaki (South Island), the largest of three roughly paralell alpine lakes running along the northern edge of the Mackenzie Basin on New Zealand's South Island. The glacial feed to the lake gives it a distinctive blue color, created by glacial flour, the extremely finely ground rock particles from glaciers.

Thé way to explore New Zealand!

Thé way to explore New Zealand!

RVing in New Zealand puts us right in the middle of gorgeous scenery. Watch the proportions!

In the gallery a selection of my most favorite shots made on our 2019 and 2020 journeys to New-Zealand

Click on an image in the webgallery to view a larger version.

A New-Zealand Must See Attraction!

A New-Zealand Must See Attraction!

180 degree panorama view of Tongariro National Park's heart of active volcanoes (North Island). From left to right: Mt Tongariro with its red, raw craters; the charred cinder cone of Mt Ngaruahoe; and majestic Mt Ruapehu's snowy crown.

Tongariro National Park (North Island)

Tongariro National Park (North Island)

Containing both active and extinct volcanoes, Tongariro National Park (central North Island) is a UNESCO World Heritage area. The cream of the Park's hikes is the 19 km Tonagariro Alpine Crossing, which provides an opportunity to experience some of the most scenic volcanically active areas. In the front the red raw crater of Mt Tonagriro and behind the charred cinder cone of Mt Ngaruahoe.

Red Crater

Red Crater

Red Crater, the highest point on the Tangariro Alpine crossing (North Island) at 1,886 m. Red Crater is a deep U-shaped crater with iron-rich earth that is a mix of vivid reds and dark chocolaty browns. The crater’s color comes from oxidized iron (rust) in the soil. This is an active volcanic area, and eruptions are possible at any time without warning!

Ngā Rotopounamu

Ngā Rotopounamu

Emerald lakes in the crater of the Tongariro volcano (North Island). Minerals leached from the surrounding rock cause the colour of the lakes.

Central Crater

Central Crater

An old lava flow from Red Crater spreading out across the floor of Central Crater. Steam rises from fumaroles, a reminder that this is an active volcanic area.

Blue Lake (North Island)

Blue Lake (North Island)

Te Wai Whakaata o te Rangihīro (or Blue Lake) is a cold acidic lake. The lake is Tapu (sacred) and it is disrespectful to touch, enter, eat or drink around its shores. The Tongariro Alpine Crossing is one of New Zealand’s most spectacular tramping tracks and a 'must do' in this area.

Bay of Plenty

Bay of Plenty

The Bay of Plenty region (North Island) is home to spectacular beaches.

Pacific Coast

Pacific Coast

Amazing views on the coast of the South Pacific Ocean on Coromandel Peninsula (North Island).

Prepared for landing...

Prepared for landing...

The volcano breaths, roars and hisses from steaming vents releasing 800°C toxic gases. It has had around 35 small to moderate eruptions since 1826.

Whakaari - White Island

Whakaari - White Island

The active marine volcano Whakaari, situated 50 km off the coast of the North Island, is 321 metres above sea level, but goes down at least 1,600 metres to the sea bed. The crater is about 30 metres above sea level, which is one of the factors that makes it unique in the world.

Crater landing

Crater landing

With helmets and gas masks on we were ready to explore the volcanic island!

Take care!

Take care!

During the last large eruption in 2000 a new crater emerged and the current crater lake was formed. The lake is filled with a mixture of steaming hydrochloric acid and sulphuric acid with a temperature which can rise to 800 degrees... Falling into the lake means certain death. The poisonous mixture reduces body and bones to nothing.

Pōhutu geyser - Rotorua (North Island)

Pōhutu geyser - Rotorua (North Island)

Pōhutu is the largest geyser in the southern hemisphere. She erupts once or twice each hour and can reach heights of 30 metres.

Te Puhia - Rotorua (North Island)

Te Puhia - Rotorua (North Island)

Te Puia is a sprawling reserve of geothermal activity, including mudpots. This is a sort of acidic hot spring with limited water. It usually takes the form of a pool of bubbling mud.

Marlborough Sounds (South Island)

Marlborough Sounds (South Island)

1,500 km of winding coastline is home of secluded bays in New Zealand's Marlborough Sounds.

Marlborough Wine Region (South Island)

Marlborough Wine Region (South Island)

Situated at the the top of South Island, Marlborough is New-Zealand's largest and most famous wine region, and accounting for 75% of the country's wine production.

SH80 (South Island)

SH80 (South Island)

The 'SH80' is the incredibly scenic drive to Mount Cook and skirts the shore of Lake Pukaki beneath the textured slopes of the Ben Ohau Range.

A paradise for hikers

A paradise for hikers

New Zealand is a paradise for hikers, with stunning scenery across the country.

Tinline Bay - Abel Tasman National Park (South Island)

Tinline Bay - Abel Tasman National Park (South Island)

Abel Tasman National Park is renowned for its golden beaches, sculptured granite cliffs, and its world-famous coast track.

Abel Tasman National Park (South Island)

Abel Tasman National Park (South Island)

A kayak trip will take you along a stunning stretch of coastline.

West Coast (South Island)

West Coast (South Island)

Locked between the fierce Tasman Sea on one side and the dramatic Southern Alps on the other, the West Coast of New-Zealand's South Island is a unique place with stunning scenery!

Pancake Rocks - Punakaiki (South Island)

Pancake Rocks - Punakaiki (South Island)

The Pancake Rocks are a heavily eroded limestone area where the Tasman Sea bursts through several blowholes during high tides.

Lake Hāwea (South Island)

Lake Hāwea (South Island)

Lake Hāwea stretches 35 km from north to south and lies in a glacial valley formed during the last ice age.

Glacier Hiking - Franz Josef Glacier (South Island)

Glacier Hiking - Franz Josef Glacier (South Island)

The Franz Josef glacier is a favorite spot for glacier hiking!

Tasman Glacier Lake (South Island)

Tasman Glacier Lake (South Island)

Icebergs are clearly visible from the air. Underneath this lake the ice is still over 200 metres thick.

Fox Glacier (South Island)

Fox Glacier (South Island)

With over 150 glaciers within the Aoraki/Mount Cook National Park, this is an unmissable part of New Zealand's landscape.

Wildlife

The rocky coasts and sandy beaches along the South Island's south and east coast provide many habitats for marine mammals and birds.

Kaikoura Peninsula - Kean Point (South Island)

Kaikoura Peninsula - Kean Point (South Island)

Great opportunities to observe seals.

Dusky Dolphins

Dusky Dolphins

A small stocky and acrobatic species of dolphin seen around the Kaikōura coast (South Island).

Hooker's Sea Lions -Pounawea (South Island)

Hooker's Sea Lions -Pounawea (South Island)

The New-Sealand sea lion, also known as Hooker's sea lion, is a species of seal lion that primarily breeds around the coast of the South Island. The Hooker's sea lion is the world's rarerst seal lion species.

Kawau

Kawau

The Kawau (pied cormorrant) can be seen along New-Zealand's Southern Scenic Route through the Catlins.

Blue Pinguïn - Otago Peninsula (South Island)

Blue Pinguïn - Otago Peninsula (South Island)

The very rare korora, or blue pinguïn, is the smallest pinguïn in the world (an adult korora meausers 30 cm). The korora only occurs along the east coast of the South Island.

Royal Albatross

Royal Albatross

On a breezy day along the east coast we saw the majestic royal albatross with his huge 3-meters wingspan. Shot made with Nikon D5600 and Sigma 150-600 mm 1:5-6.3 telephoto lens, with 600 mm focal length.

Himantopus - Sandfly Bay (South Island)

Himantopus - Sandfly Bay (South Island)

The pied stilt is a dainty wading bird with black and white coloration and very long legs. It is common at wetlands and coastal areas throughout New-Zealand and may be seen feeding alongside oystercatchers. Pied stilts tend to be shy of people and fly away, yapping, when approached. Thanks to the enormous telephoto range of my Nikon P1000, I was able to take this shot without disturbing the bird (focal length 800mm).

More updates follow soon!

White-faced heron - Abel Tasman National Park (South Island)

White-faced heron - Abel Tasman National Park (South Island)

The white-faced heron is New-Zealand's medium sized blue-grey heron with white face, long dark grey bill and pale yellow legs. In flight the open wings show a marked contrast between the pale grey fore-wing and dark grey main flight feathers on both the upper and lower surfaces. Shot made with Nikon P1000 - 500 mm focal length.

Pounawea (South Island)

Pounawea (South Island)

The beautiful coastline of Pounawea, an area of the southern South Island of New-Zealand.

Kawaupaka

Kawaupaka

The little pied cormorant (Kawaupaka in Maori) is a common Australasian waterbird found around the coasts, islands, estuaries, and inland waters of Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia an New-Zealand.

Kawaupaka

Kawaupaka

In New-Zealand the species is, apart from his Maori name, also known as the little shag. The bird is measuring 55-60 cm.

Te Waewae Bay

Te Waewae Bay

Te Waewae Bay at South Island's southcoast.