"It is often said that there are no more frontiers to explore.

 Alaska is the great exception"

Alaska

On the northern edges of the New World there is a vast continuous wilderness with dimensions that go far beyond our European imagination.

Alaska is surrounded by the Arctic Ocean, the Pacific Ocean, separated from Russia by the Bering Street and in the east it is adjacent to Canada (Yukon Territory and British Columbia). Alaska extends to an area around the arctic circle of 586,400 sq. miles.

Alaska is an impressive area with an infinite variety of landscapes and natural beauty.

It is a country with magnificent mountain ranges with the highest peaks in the United States,

it has more than 100,000 glaciers, some of immense. proportions. It has 3 million lakes, forests,

tundra, taga and deep fjord coasts.

Alaska is a country where bears and reindeer can roam freely and where the surrounding

seas teem with life.

Follow us on our journeys through Alaska and experience incredible adventures in one

of the most pristine areas of the North American continent. 

The pictures and background stories are a source of inspiration for those who are interested

in Alaska or for those who are perhaps planning to travel through this magnificent area!

In the gallery a random selection of our most favorite Alaska shots

Kayakking in Alaska allows you to experience another side of this magnificent destination.

Where the road ends, the real Alaska begins!

With less than 10,000 miles of road in a state one fifth of the size of the US, flying is the only way to reach backcountry areas in Alaska.

Bush planes offer the opportunity to view the most remote areas of Alaska in a perspective that is impossible to get while travelling over land.

The small planes are equipped with floats to land on lakes or rivers while others deploy ski's to land on snowy glaciers.

Join us on our once-in-a-liftime flights over a variety of dramatic terrains and get an up-close view of snow-capped peaks and glaciers!

Wrangell-St. Elias National Park

Wrangell-St. Elias National Park

Streams of ice from the Kennicot- and Root glacier flow together like rivers, forming glacier complexes that cover hundreds and hundreds of square miles in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park.

Glacier Flying

Glacier Flying

Low pass over Fourpeaked Glacier, Katmai National Park.

John Hopkins Glacier

John Hopkins Glacier

A glorious landscape of inexorable glaciers in Glaciers Bay National Park. The glaciers seen here today are remnants of a general ice advance -the Little Ice Age- that began about 4,000 years ago. The smaller glacier on the left is named Daniel Coit Gilman Glacier.

The Formation of a Glacier

The Formation of a Glacier

Glaciers originated in the mountains. Over time, falling snow piles up in the mountain recesses, and ever so slowly the weight of accumulating snow compacts lower layers into dense ice. When the ice becomes thick enough, it starts to move down hill.

Catch of the Day!

Catch of the Day!

An American bald eagle, here catching a piece of salmon in Salmon Creek (near Seward at the Kenai peninsula), can not get their feathers wet. The prey they capture from the water must be at or near the surface.

Matanuska Glacier

Matanuska Glacier

The ice of the Matanuska Glacier takes aprox. 250 years to form upglacier and advance to the terminus.

Katmai National Park

Katmai National Park

View over the Sikshak river and the vast wilderness of Katmai in Southwest Alaska. The isolated location is not accessible by road so we travel within these regions by bushplane.

Shoup Glacier

Shoup Glacier

The face of Shoup Glacier at the end of Shoup Bay (Prince William Sound) near Valdez. This islolated location is only accessible by kayak.

Kayak Adventure

Kayak Adventure

Icebergs, calved from Valdez Glacier, thrills kayakers in Lake Valdez.

Knik Glacier

Knik Glacier

A labyrinth of icebergs in Lake George, a glacial lake formed near the face of Knik Glacier. This glacier, located just 50 miles north of Anchorage, is only accessible by air-boat.

Margerie Glacier

Margerie Glacier

The Margerie Glacier (Glacier Bay Nat. Park), with a length of 20 miles, flows from Mount Root down to Tarr Inlet. In recent years the glacier has been stable . It was named after the French geographer and geologist Emmanuel de Margerie who visited Glacier Bay in 1913.

Glacier Hiking

Glacier Hiking

A glacier hiker pass a meltwater pond on the Root Glacier in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park. Such ponds may seem innocuous, but their fridgis waters make the danger spots for hikers.

Blackstone Glacier

Blackstone Glacier

The tidewater glaciers in Blackstone Bay are only accessible by boat.

Glacier Bay

Glacier Bay

Glacier Bay National Park (13,000-sq miles) is home to twelve tidewater glaciers that calve icebergs into the bay. In part because of variations in snow accumulations, most glaciers in the eastern and southwestern areas of the bay are receding, while several on its west side are advancing. When Capt. George Vancouver sailed the Alaska coast in 1794, Glacier Bay did not exist. It lay beneath a sheet of glacial ice several miles wide and thousands of feet thick.

Feathers and Fury

Feathers and Fury

All feathers and fury, a bald eagle flies through the Alaskan sky.

Glacier Bay National Park

Glacier Bay National Park

Fueled by prodigious winter snows, this glacier cascade of the 15,300 ft Fairweather Mountains Range in Alaska.

Mount Drum - Wrangell Mountains

Mount Drum - Wrangell Mountains

Sunset over Glenallen.

Flying Wild Alaska

Flying Wild Alaska

Weather rules life in Alaska. The hazard of flying in the state are numerous. Bushpilots must deal with rain, snow, fog and wind. But the reward is flying in the most beautiful scenery!

Scenic Alaska

Scenic Alaska

Ice from Columbia Glacier drifts in the chilly waters of Prince William Sound.

Kayak Adventure

Kayak Adventure

Alaska has the country's longest coastline and paddling a kayak is a great way to get in touch with the stunning landscape and a delicate eco-system that thrive along Alaska's shores.

Grand Pacific Glacier

Grand Pacific Glacier

Glacier Bay National Park (13,000-sq miles) is home to twelve tidewater glaciers that calve icebergs into the bay. The Grand Pacific Glacier originally covered this entire area with ice. Between 1794 and 1916 the glacier retreated 65 miles (!) and created the current Glacier Bay.

Glacier Bay National Park

Glacier Bay National Park

There are no roads to Glacier Bay and entry into this park by boat is carefully regulated. The ultimate way to visit this National Park is… by air!

Reid Glacier

Reid Glacier

This 11 mile long glacier is the fastest moving of the tidewater glaciers at Glacier Bay National Park. It is moving at an average rate of about 8 feet per day and the three quarters of a mile wide face rises 150 feet above the water line. The Glacier was named after Harry Fielding Reid, who led expeditions to Glacier Bay in 1890 and 1892.

World of Ice

World of Ice

Huge ice masses creeps downhill from the icefields of the St. Elias Mountains.

More updates follow soon.

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For over 30 years, I am a dedicated user of Nikon camera's and lenses. 

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